Family

Left to right: Tom, Donna, Sarah, John Mark, Drew, Sinclair

This doesn’t happen very often as our kids live in LA and NYC. It was so good to be together here in MSP over the holidays.

Merry Christmas 🎄

Donna and I pray that your Christmas was filled with joy and peace as you celebrated the birth of Jesus the Christ.

May God grant us all faith and courage as we determine to love mercy, do justly and walk humbly throughout the coming new year!

Justice, compassion and sacrifice

Justice without love is hatred by another name. Dressing hatred in the mental trappings of justice leaves us feeling both right and powerful. This renders it toxic.

Compassion without justice is corruption. Clothing corruption in robes of compassion leaves us feeling both good and loving. Yet it is poisonous.

Words are powerful. A slight twist in meaning can lead to violence and death at the hands of people convinced they ride a white stallion.

When justice and mercy complete one another they beget sacrifice not attack.

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Father in heaven, let your justice and compassion flow into our hearts and through our lives. Let your kingdom come and your will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Amen.

A really good day

Photo: A refugee church building funded by IAFR

I am so thankful for our growing team of partners that generously invest in the welfare of refugees through the work of IAFR.

Because of them, I had the joy of initiating an international transfer of funds to our refugee church partners in Kakuma refugee camp (Kenya) yesterday. The funds will soon be transformed into 14 new refugee church buildings!

The buildings are desperately needed as the climate is harsh and our brothers and sisters need a shaded and protected space in which to gather and worship together. These communities of faith play a critical role in keeping hope alive and affirming the dignity of people who have been stripped of everything.

IAFR partners have put a roof over the head of 28 refugee churches this year! That’s a record!

What a great Christmas gift! Not only does it meet a critical need, it also is a tangible expression that they are not forgotten by the church at large!

But there’s even more good news! Our financial partners empowered us to set another international transfer to Kakuma. This one covers the 2020 high school fees for 5 girls that we are sponsoring! This investment has the potential to radically change the future prospects of these girls – and their families!

Can you tell I’m excited? And so thankful? None of this happens unless we partner together.

Place

Falingi (above with flag in hand) became an American today along with 731 other people from 81 different countries of origin.

This is a big deal, because Falingi has been a refugee for most of his life. Unchecked violence made his homeland uninhabitable. As he was without parents, his uncle took him into his family. I met them over 10 years ago in Dzaleka refugee camp in Malawi – among the world’s poorest nations.

Dzaleka was a political prison before it was turned into a refugee camp in 1994 (in response to a wave of refugees fleeing genocide in Rwanda). Life is hard in Dzaleka.

Above: Dzaleka refugee camp. There are 40,000 Falingis in Dzaleka today.

This is why refugee resettlement to countries like the USA is so important. It offers people like Falingi a chance to regain place in the world and rebuild his life.

It is a travesty that the US has slashed refugee resettlement numbers from an average of 75,000/year to just 18,000 this year.

I spoke with several of the new US citizens today. They were so happy and so proud. Like Falingi, they want to work hard and be a net contributor to society.

In there eyes I saw an America that gave me hope and inspiration.

Death on the highway

My heart is heavy. I received tragic news this week from a pastor/friend in Kakuma, Kenya. A soccer game in the refugee camp went wrong. Ethnic fighting broke out leaving six refugees dead.

Kakuma is around 60 miles from the border of Kenya and South Sudan. Years of ethnic violence plagues South Sudan. It is no surprise that such outbursts would happen in the camp that is host to tribes that are at war with each other just over the border.

Hopelessness doesn’t help. Many of our friends in Kakuma have been there for decades with no hope of ever leaving. Yet as refugee camps are temporary by definition, neither can they stay forever. The resulting emotional stress is impossible for people like you and I to comprehend – unless you’ve experienced it firsthand yourself.

Add to the stress of having no place in the world, insufficient food rations, restrictions on movement, rationed water, hostile climate, overcrowded schools, etc. and it is a wonder that more such violence doesn’t occur.

May God use the refugee church in Kakuma to help bring reconciliation and restore peace and safety to the camp. Amen.

YMCA

I met Henry Crosby today. He’s the Sr. Director of Social Responsibility at the YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities this morning. We met at the Y’s Equity and Innovation Center in downtown Minneapolis. A friend from a past church brought us together. I’m glad she did.

I was so impressed with Henry and the Y’s Equity Center. God knows our city needs the kind of services they offer with the aim of bringing people together. I really appreciate the heart, passion and humility of the Y’s staff.

The Y’s New Americans program is an initiative that is helping refugees and asylum seekers and other migrants find their feet and their place in our society. I’m hoping our local Jonathan House residents will one day benefit from some of their programs!

I discovered that Henry lives near my childhood home in Golden Valley! We’re around the same age so we took a brief detour down memory lane talking about a place in which we share history. Once again Inexperienced how shared place is a powerful connecting force between people.

Sone unlikely threads came together today – a friend from a former church, Golden Valley and a concern for the welfare of displaced people. That was special. And it just might lead to mutual blessing down the road.

The IAFR Service Team

The IAFR “Service Team” came to the Minnesota office last week for our annual assessment and planning sessions. We are a decentralized team, with two in Peoria, IL, two more in Grand Rapids, MI, and four of us here in the Twin Cities. While we get a lot done working remotely and leveraging Zoom video conferencing, we occasionally need to meet face to face for more in-depth assessment and decision-making.

A highlight of our meetings last week was the shared conviction that the Service Team measures our success by the effectiveness of our missionaries in the field, who in turn, measure their effectiveness by their life-giving impact in the lives of refugees where they serve.

I thank God for the privilege of working alongside of these devoted colleagues!

The Service Team includes IAFR’s…

  • US Regional Leader – supporting our teams in Colorado, Georgia, and Minnesota
  • Director of Training – both internal missionary training and external training opportunities for other missions and churches
  • Our Director or Project Management – assisting with the development of new projects and tracking active projects
  • Assistant Director of Operations – assisting the Executive VP, primarily with mobilisation
  • Executive Team Assistant – assisting the President and Executive VP as needed
  • Executive Vice President – Overseeing Finance, HR, Service Team
  • President – Overseeing Regional Leader support, IAFR US – IAFR Canada collaboration, Board Development, Development, Publications, Website, engagement with World Evangelical Alliance
  • Director of Social Media – she’s presently in training and raising support. We hope to see her active by early 2020

Happy Thanksgiving

My wife and I escaped the winter storm in Minnesota to spend Thanksgiving on the family farm in central Missouri. Apparently 8″ of white stuff fell on our home after we left on Tuesday.

I hope your thanksgiving is filled with gratitude for Gods faithfulness this week 🦃

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Meanwhile I continue to read Richard Twiss’s “Rescuing the Gospel from the Cowboys”. It seems appropriate as we celebrate and remember the welcome and hospitality the early Europeans received from indigenous people here (and reflect on how those who received it quickly turned around and abused those who welcomed them).