Consulting with refugees

Some of the Refugee Church leaders with whom we are partnering in Kakuma. Photo 10/2018.

The association of refugee churches with whom we partner in Kakuma refugee camp (Kenya) has grown from 7 to over 160 churches since 2000. But they have not updated their organisational systems and structures to cope with the growth.

I spent most of today consulting with Pastor Gatera, former Chairman of the association of churches in Kakuma, to discuss some basic organisational structures/frameworks for them to consider.

It was time well spent as they now own land, a building and have a growing arsenal of ministry resources (including a solar projector).

While such discussion isn’t exactly exciting, it turns out that the long-term effectiveness of their work depends upon clear and strong organisational systems – no easy feat in a refugee camp environment.

My role is not to tell them what to do or how to do it. They are fully able to make such decisions. But they are cut off from the rest of the world and they value outside perspective and input as they think such things through.

I’ll be visiting them again next month and suspect that we will spend some concentrated time discussing these things in depth together.

Life-changing projects

I picked up website design skills over the years and serve as IAFR’s webmaster. I had the joy of adding 3 IAFR projects to the website yesterday – all part of our work in Dzaleka refugee camp, Malawi.

All three projects make a significant contribution to a person’s ability to recover from forced displacement.

The Vocational Training Project helps people develop practical skills and abilities that are likely to lead toward meaningful employment.

The Refugee Scholarship Project is helping disadvantaged people qualify for meaningful employment and increases their potential to become social influencers for good.

The Small Business Venture Project is helping people start businesses that will help them survive and make ends meet. These businesses can change the future trajectory of a family.

We’ve already seen how these projects make a tremendous life-giving difference in people’s lives.

We are now opening up the possibility for more people to share in the joy of making such a meaningful difference in the lives of the people in Dzaleka.

Learn more at www.IAFR.org/projects

The Refugee Church

I just created this 1.5 minute video to use when speaking to an Adult Sunday School Class tomorrow

I’ll be speaking at Hope Presbyterian Church in Richfield, MN, tomorrow morning. I’m taking Pastor Jean Pierre Gatera with me as the church asked me to share about the refugee church and Pastor Gatera spent 20 years of his life in Kakuma refugee camp – and many of those years as a refugee pastor. I can think of no better way to introduce them to the refugee church than to give them the privilege of listening to Pastor Gatera.

Water in the desert

Photo: hydro geological survey results

I spent part of the day reading over a hydro-geological survey that ends with this chart pointing to a promising borehole site in Kakuma, Kenya.

This is the crucial step before drilling down over 1 football field deep in hopes of finding plentiful drinkable water.

And that water will ultimately be pumped to an IDP Camp several miles away where over 2000 internally displaced people (mostly women and children) live without a local source of water.

Drilling could start before the year runs out! What a wonderful end to the year!

Click here to learn more about this project!

KISOM update

Photo: The Kakuma Interdenominational School of Mission (KISOM) building project today

Nicholas Gagai, a Kenyan serving full time with our refugee partner in Kakuma refugee camp, sent me the above photo last week via Facebook. It is encouraging to see the KISOM building rising out of the semi desert at long last. Everything looks on schedule to complete this phase of building before the end of the year.

Nicholas serves as the director of KISOM. IAFR has been helping him and the school strengthen their curriculum when it comes to theology and trauma care. Wheaton College and it’s Humanitarian Disaster Institute have been partnering with IAFR to assist KISOM.

IAFR is putting a lot of time, resources and energy into this part of our work in Kakuma as we believe KISOM plays a critical role in equipping refugee pastors and church leaders. We are thankful to our financial partners who have made it possible!

Photo: the KISOM building project during my visit in 10/2018

IDP in Kakuma

I created some resources for a partner church to use to promote their year end special offering – the IAFR Kenya Water Project. This meant going through my photos from the IDP Camp that will soon finally get a local supply of clean water (hopefully by 12/2019).

I love these people and would like you to visit their world and meet some of them. Here are a few photos to that end…

Let there be water

Photo: IDP walk miles to fetch water unfit for human consumption

I got word tonight from a partner church that they are taking on the IDP Water Project as their Year end missions project!

We need around $10-25,000 more to have enough to finish this massive project in the semi desert of Kakuma, Kenya.

I love how the supporting church is concerned about what IAFR will do if they raise more than what is needed to complete the project! These are generous people and joyful givers. Beautiful.

I admit that when IAFR launched this project, my faith was weak. The cost estimate quickly went from $18k to $125k as the realities sank in of the costs of finding, pumping and piping water several miles across semi desert.

Yet here we are, on the edge of seeing God answer 10 years of prayer for water from the internally displaced people in Kakuma.