Kakuma bound

Photo: the Kakuma airstrip

I packed my bags today as it is time to head back to Kakuma refugee camp (Kenya). You can follow my trip by visiting the Kenya blog. You can also see posts and photos and videos from previous visits.

This month’s trip has a lot going on – everything from theological training to following up on a school building project to checking on progress of an well/water project.

While I don’t relish the thought of going from 0 F to 100+ F in the coming days, I do look forward to reconnecting with friends and church leaders in Kakuma.

A global faith community

A young man in a Middle East war zone asked a friend of his living in Central America if he knew of any trustworthy friends in a country in North Africa. He plans to flee there soon.

The friend in Central America messaged me last night to ask if I know of any such brothers and sisters. I reached out to some friends in the North African country and am waiting to hear back.

The church is a remarkable global community.

I pray there is a brother that will be able to meet this young man when he arrives in search of refuge.

Kakuma planning

With Pastor Gatera this week

I’ll be visiting Kakuma refugee camp again later this month. As always, I consulted with my friend and IAFR colleague, Pastor Gatera, to offer perspective on my trip priorities.

Pastor Gatera spent 20 years of his life as a refugee there and now lives here in the Twin Cities. He is a man of great wisdom and faith. What a joy to partner together!

This visit to Kakuma will include several days of theological training with a group of 25 Christian leaders (men and women). Professor George Kalantzis from Wheaton College will be doing the training as he has for the past several years.

I’ll also be following up on active IAFR projects in Kakuma (refugee scholarship program, IDP water project, KISOM building project, Shelter for refugees, Refugee youth camp, 2020 refugee pastors’ conference and more).

Of course the best part of any visit is reconnecting with our friends there.

A Syrian cries for help

IAFR receives a steady flow of emails and social media messages from refugees that find themselves in difficult situations. Just this week alone I’ve been in dialog with a Christian in Pakistan with grave concerns about the dangers Pakistani refugees face in Thailand; a Nepalese woman in Poland who is asking for advice before seeking asylum somewhere in Europe; and a Syrian in Turkey who is losing hope and desperate to find a way out.

While it isn’t easy to hear of their suffering and loss of hope, I’m glad we can be here for them. Although we are often not able to offer hands on assistance, we are able to affirm their dignity and pray for them. I am often encouraged when they express how much that simple response means to them.

Here are excerpts from my emails with the Syrian refugee in Turkey today:

Part of my initial response to the Syrian’s initial inquiry:
I know that your situation feels like you are stripped of your dignity. Please take heart knowing that your difficult situation does not define you. You are a valuable and loved creation of God. Although your circumstances are difficult, God has not abandoned you. He is with you. We pray that you will know God’s good presence and that you know that he sees you and cares for you.”

The Syrian:
OMG! God bless u sir Tom, i couldn,t believe that u r answering me!! Very kind and gentle of u sir.Thanks for ur supporting words… U r soo gentle and big hearted man full of charity seeds … Swear God u make me optimistic ‘ u really insert hope into my life and there is still charity in this life , because u r there! Yes sir …..it is only reality. Take care of ur self ANGLE Tom, and keep on touch pls.”


Consulting with refugees

Some of the Refugee Church leaders with whom we are partnering in Kakuma. Photo 10/2018.

The association of refugee churches with whom we partner in Kakuma refugee camp (Kenya) has grown from 7 to over 160 churches since 2000. But they have not updated their organisational systems and structures to cope with the growth.

I spent most of today consulting with Pastor Gatera, former Chairman of the association of churches in Kakuma, to discuss some basic organisational structures/frameworks for them to consider.

It was time well spent as they now own land, a building and have a growing arsenal of ministry resources (including a solar projector).

While such discussion isn’t exactly exciting, it turns out that the long-term effectiveness of their work depends upon clear and strong organisational systems – no easy feat in a refugee camp environment.

My role is not to tell them what to do or how to do it. They are fully able to make such decisions. But they are cut off from the rest of the world and they value outside perspective and input as they think such things through.

I’ll be visiting them again next month and suspect that we will spend some concentrated time discussing these things in depth together.

Life-changing projects

I picked up website design skills over the years and serve as IAFR’s webmaster. I had the joy of adding 3 IAFR projects to the website yesterday – all part of our work in Dzaleka refugee camp, Malawi.

All three projects make a significant contribution to a person’s ability to recover from forced displacement.

The Vocational Training Project helps people develop practical skills and abilities that are likely to lead toward meaningful employment.

The Refugee Scholarship Project is helping disadvantaged people qualify for meaningful employment and increases their potential to become social influencers for good.

The Small Business Venture Project is helping people start businesses that will help them survive and make ends meet. These businesses can change the future trajectory of a family.

We’ve already seen how these projects make a tremendous life-giving difference in people’s lives.

We are now opening up the possibility for more people to share in the joy of making such a meaningful difference in the lives of the people in Dzaleka.

Learn more at www.IAFR.org/projects

From Kakuma refugee camp

Photo: A Sudanese refugee reading her Bible during a worship service in Kakuma refugee camp last Sunday

I’ve been posting photos and stories to the IAFR Kakuma blog for the past 2 weeks. I encourage you to check it out!

Click Here to view the IAFR Kakuma blog

Packing up

It’s that time again. I head out to visit my friends in Kakuma refugee camp (Kenya) this week.

One nice thing about the semi desert there is that it helps me pack light 🙂 Daily highs there are presently hovering around 100 F. Meanwhile back here I watched the snow falling out our window while packing today…

Follow the trip at https://kenya.iafr.org

Photo: 2 weeks worth of stuff to pack