Violence in Nairobi

After an extended season of relative quiet, Nairobi suffered a terrorist attack today. The dust is still settling, so the death toll remains uncertain.

As far as I know, our many friends there were not among the victims. Yet I know any such attack causes everyone a measure of trauma.

Violence. It is the ultimate fruit of sin when it has matured. Cain’s sin moved him to kill Abel. Violence was so prevalent at one time that God grieved he made us. He gave us another chance after the flood. When God later walked among us, the religious and political powers of the day turned on him in extreme violence. And yet, among Jesus’ final words were “Father, forgive them.”

Most of the refugees we serve are victims of unchecked violence in their homelands. They see no alternative but to flee to another country in hope of finding safety.

Around 1/2 million refugees have sought temporary refuge in Kenya. I have little doubt that today’s violence in Nairobi awakened old fears.

Maranatha. Lord Jesus, come.

Click here to read a related news report.

Pioneering

I’m going to spend most of my day tomorrow with Kelsey, a twenty-something who joined IAFR last year to serve in Ventimiglia, Italy – an unknown smallish Italian city on the border with France.

Kelsey was with the IAFR research team that stumbled upon Ventimiglia and discovered many asylum-seekers and refugees are living there in squalid conditions – men, women and children from distant countries, most of which are experiencing protracted war.

Kelsey and I are going to explore what to anticipate when pioneering a new IAFR ministry location.

In preparation, I came upon the following definitions of pioneering…

  • One of the first to settle in a territory
  • A plant or animal capable of establishing itself in a bare, barren, or open area and initiating an ecological cycle
  • A person or group that originates or helps open up a new line of thought or activity or a new method or technical development

All three of these ideas apply to what Kelsey plans to do. The second bullet point conjures up a beautiful and hopeful image that I hope will prove true of her life in coming years.

Some might look down on her because of her age and think it unreasonable for someone like her to step into the complexities and unknowns of Ventimiglia. But I am partial to twenty-somethings. I was 22 years old when I set out to pioneer ministry in a remote Austrian village that wasn’t even found on maps…

I Am Every Asylum Seeker

This video was produced by IAFR’s team serving refugees in Minneapolis/St. Paul. It was shown this morning during their “Sheltering Hope” Breakfast Fundraiser for our Jonathan House ministry – through which we are partnering with churches to offer shelter and hope to asylum seekers in the Twin Cities.

Legal counsel

One of today’s challenges was to get legal counsel concerning how we process applications for housing in the shelter ministry we operate for asylum seekers in the Twin Cities. Things are often not as simple as they first appear.

I’m thankful for the excellent leadership of Sarah Miller, our local Ministry Leader. I’m also thankful for the wisdom and perspective of Jenn Urban, our legal consultant at Legal for Good on such issues.